Acknowledgments

PARTS OF this book were read by Edgar M. Branch, Gene Brown, Jules Chametzky, Kathe Davis, Steven Esposito, Sanford Marovitz, Peter Parisi, Jack Salzman, and Taylor Stoehr. I am grateful for their suggestions and encouragement. I owe a special debt of gratitude to Nenos Georgopoulos and Douglas Radcliff-Umstead whose critiques of the entire manuscript were invaluable.

I am indebted to J. Riis Owre who aided my work on Jacob A. Riis and gave me permission to quote from the Riis holdings in the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library; to Lewis Mumford who encouraged my reading of his archival holdings; to Edgar M. Branch and Cleo Paturis who helped me in my work on Farrell and allowed me to quote from material belonging to the Farrell estate in the Farrell Collection at the University of Pennsylvania's Van Pelt Library; and to Taylor Stoehr and Sally Goodman who answered my questions about Paul Goodman and generously made available a number of Goodman's early essays.

Thanks also to Alexander Alland, Sr., William Boelhower, Thomas M. Davis, James T. Farrell, John Fierst, Norman Fischer, Percival Goodman, and Leo Hershkowitz for their courteous help and advice.

My work was made much easier through assistance, early and late, given to me by Sally Arteseros of Doubleday; Esther Brumberg of the photography archive section of the Museum of the City of New York; Michael Cole of Kent State University's Interlibrary Loan; Ellen S. Dunlap, research librarian at the Humanities Research Center, University of Texas; Anne Gordon, librarian of the Long Island Historical Society; Kenneth A. Lohf, librarian for rare books and manuscripts at Columbia University; Kenneth McCormick of Doubleday; Neda Westlake of the Van Pelt Library of the University of Pennsylvania.

Thanks are in order to my friends whose encouragement and support were so helpful: Peter and Helen Benson, Normand and Barbara Berlin, Anne Carver, Adeline Esposito, Thomas and Margaret Magnani, Marylee and Dale Richards, Lawrence and Celeste Starzyk, and Igina Tattoni.

-vii-

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Makers of the City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1- Jacob A. Riis: The City As Christian Fraternity 10
  • Chapter 2- Lewis Mumford: The City as Man 64
  • Chapter 3- James T. Farrell: The City As Society 119
  • Chapter 4- Paul Goodman: The City as Self 159
  • Epilogue 207
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliographical Notes 231
  • Index 237
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