Notes

Introduction
1. It is worth asking if Riis, Mumford, Farrell, and Goodman knew each other. There are tangible connections among three of them, but these are not central to my reading of them or the literature they helped create. Their public exchanges were infrequent, and focusing on them would diminish the common questions their works present--though such questions often animate these writers' critiques of one another. Goodman and his brother Percival, an architect, met Farrell in the early 1940s. Paul Goodman clearly impressed and perhaps dazzled the older Farrell, who entered in his diary brief remarks about Goodman's wit, his poverty, and his sketchy observations on community planning. Mumford and Farrell quarreled in 1930 over the meaning of Dewey's naturalism, and Farrell seemed to have nurtured a grudge against Mumford, or so Farrell's letters indicate. Later, Farrell awkwardly attacked Mumford over the significance of regionalist theory. In his turn, Mumford cautioned Van Wyck Brooks not to pay attention to Farrell's criticism. In their turn, the Goodmans wrangled with Mumford about the achievements of the garden city, though Paul later honored Mumford by calling him the "dean" of American urban thinkers. For these three living in New York, Riis may have been a name to them, but it would have been a name with a presence. The city they inhabited was physically transformed by him. The city they wrote about depended, in large measure, upon his pioneering conception of it.
2. Historically convenient origins, excluding the scientism of a Henry Adams, a Walter Bagehot, and a Herbert Spencer, are August Meitzen, History, Theory, and Technique of Statistics, translated by Roland Parker and published in English by the American Academy of Political and Social Science in 1891; Marcus Reynolds, The Housing of the Poor in American Cities ( 1893), the prize piece of the American Economic Association; and Adna F. Weber's brilliant study, The Growth of Cities in the Nineteenth Century: A Study in Statistics ( 1899).

1. Jacob A. Riis: The City as Christian Fraternity

Unless otherwise noted, newspaper material and letters come from the Riis Collection at the Library of Congress. This newspaper file of articles by and about Riis constitutes the largest holding of such material. In a scrapbook, apparently put together with material gathered by a press-clipping service, Riis saved accounts of his doings. Often, the citation of dates appears to be in his hand. Because of the

-211-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Makers of the City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1- Jacob A. Riis: The City As Christian Fraternity 10
  • Chapter 2- Lewis Mumford: The City as Man 64
  • Chapter 3- James T. Farrell: The City As Society 119
  • Chapter 4- Paul Goodman: The City as Self 159
  • Epilogue 207
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliographical Notes 231
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.