Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs: Arranged from American Indian Ceremonials and Sports

By Alice C. Fletcher | Go to book overview

INDIAN GAMES AND DANCES
WITH NATIVE SONGS

INTRODUCTION

THE adaptations from Indian ceremonies and sports here offered will enable those who take part in them to follow in happy mood some of the paths of expression that were opened long ago by thoughtful men and women as they lived, worked and played on this land in undisturbed intimacy with nature. Some of the thoughts bred of this intimacy find their expression in these dances and games, and it may help toward a better understanding of them and their spirit to tell briefly how the Indian looked upon and regarded his relation to nature.

The natives of America thought of the cosmos as a unit that was throbbing with the same life-force of which they were conscious within themselves; a force that gave to the rocks and hills their stable, unchanging character; to every living thing on land or water the power of growth and of movement; to man the ability to think, to will and to bring to pass. This universal and permeating life-force was always thought of as sacred, powerful, like a god. To it a name was given that varied in the different languages; in the Omaha tongue it was called Wakon'da. Through Wakon'da all things in nature were related and more or less interdependent, the sky, the earth, the animals and men.

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Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs: Arranged from American Indian Ceremonials and Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Preface xxi
  • Contents xxiii
  • Part I - Dances *
  • Indian Games and Dances With Native Songs 1
  • Dance V 9
  • Calling the Flowers 40
  • Part II - Games *
  • Indian Games 63
  • Hazard Games 67
  • Ball Games 98
  • Part III- Indian Names 115
  • Bestowing a New Name 126
  • Taking an Indian Name in Camp 132
  • Indian Names for Boys - All Vowels Have the Continental Sound 135
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