The U. S. College Graduate

By F. Lawrence Babcock | Go to book overview

dence that the Graduate Bloc, whatever its incidental cultural attainments may be, has an economic potency somewhat out of proportion to its numerical strength and its relative youth.


Chapter 2
Family Status and Home

Some of the data in this report establish a direct measure of the role that higher education plays in the material workings of a democracy. Others are relevant to the subject only according to the interpretations put upon them. For example, the size of the graduate's family may only interest the eugenist, the divorce rate may only interest the moralist, the differences between the graduates of different kinds of colleges in various parts of the country may only interest the educators and the educated themselves. All of these facts, however, are in one way or another germane, and are interpolated in this report wherever they will best serve to identify the college graduate as a member of a special social group.


TABLE D
Marital Status of Graduates by Sex Combared with Marital Status of U. S. Residents 15 or moreyears old (1930 Census)
All U. S. Residents
All Graduates15 Years Old or Over
____________________________________________________
MenWomenMenWomen
Single29.1%48.9%34.1%26.4%
Married68.145.760.161.2
Divorced1.01.81.11.3
Widowed1.83.64.711.1

The figures shown for graduates and for the population as a whole are not, of course, strictly comparable, because graduates are presumably past twenty years old and of quite marriageable age, while the population figure includes minors six or seven years younger, and therefore less likely to be married. If accurate adjustment could be made in order to exclude persons from 15 to 22 from the national

-12-

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