The U. S. College Graduate

By F. Lawrence Babcock | Go to book overview

Section II
DETAILS IN CLOSE-UP

THE main body of this report, foregoing, represents generalized findings on the U. S. Graduate Bloc as a whole -- facts so selected as to define it as a special group in the national population. It identifies the graduate according to the primary personal and economic factors that fix his place in American society. In the course of the investigation, however, and among the breakdowns and cross-tabulations of the data, is developed information which, though of perhaps only subsidiary pertinence to the main subject, is of great interest in itself. To spare the general reader the distraction of examining findings tributary to the mainstream of this report, the secondary information has been reserved for analysis in this separate section and for detailed tabulation in the Statistical Supplement -- Appendix II. From them, anyone with the time and the inclination can glean every fact, major and minor, which has been brought to light in the course of this study. Included in the following section are:

Chapter 6 -- The Alma Mater. In this chapter, the focus of attention is turned not so much upon the graduate as upon the classification of the institution in which he was educated. This is for the reader who wishes to look behind the total net results of higher education and to find whatever distinctions there may be between the identifiable origins of that education.

Chapter 7 -- The Kinds of Degrees Received. This chapter considers the question of how recipients of liberal arts degrees make out in relation to those who received degrees for more specific training -- these comparisons in light of earned income.

Chapter 8. Residential Geography of the Graduate Bloc. Of major importance has been the finding that higher education follows population so faithfully that there is

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