From Slave South to New South: Public Policy in Nineteenth-Century Georgia

By Peter Wallenstein | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

AT LAST I get to thank the people and institutions that have made this book possible. Chief among the repositories on whose holdings I have relied are the Georgia Department of Archives and History, the Georgia State Library, and the Emory University Libraries. Others include the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Boston Athenaeum, the Atlanta Historical Society, and the libraries of Atlanta University, Duke University, the University of Georgia, and Harvard University.

Columbia College provided a scholarship that enabled me to attend the school where I discovered that history could make sense and be fun. The Johns Hopkins University awarded me a National Defense Education Act Fellowship, and Ford Foundation funds paid the costs of my initial research in Georgia. Later, Sarah Lawrence College gave me a reduced teaching load the term I completed the dissertation, and the University of Toronto provided a summer travel fellowship. The University of Maryland's Asian Division took me far from my sources, and left me little time for "my own work;" but kept me a teacher and then let me return to the States to resume research and writing with the assurance that I had a classroom to go back to. Finally, the American Historical Association awarded me an Albert J. Beveridge Research Grant, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University supplied travel funds, secretarial assistance, and word processing facilities to finish the book.

Completion of a first book provides an appropriate time to acknowledge teachers who contributed even when they had no specific role in its creation. At Columbia, Orest Ranum gave me a wonderful introduction to the study of history, and Walter P. Metzger, David J. Rothman, James P. Shenton, Alden T. Vaughan, and Alan F. Westin opened new vistas. At Johns Hopkins, Charles A. Barker, Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., Robert Forster, and Jack P. Greene nurtured my developing ideas of the discipline of history and of myself as a historian. So did David Herbert Donald, who directed my dissertation and thus helped me craft an earlier version of this work, and Louis C. Galambos, who served as second reader.

Other people, too, shaped my work. From our undergraduate days to a winter in the White Mountains, David Osher and I talked history to the point that I remember wondering where his ideas left off and mine began. Harold C. Livesay, graduate school colleague long ago and department colleague and chairman more recently, wielded wisdom and forceful comments on work in progress. Other historian friends -- particularly J. William Harris and Anastatia Sims -- offered suggestions and encouragement and helped craft the final version.

-xi-

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From Slave South to New South: Public Policy in Nineteenth-Century Georgia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps, Figures, and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Society And Politics 7
  • 2 - State Power And Tax-Free Finance 23
  • 3 - The Accommodation Of The Public 32
  • 4 - Tax Upon The Time And Labor Of Our Citizens 40
  • 5 - Creating A New Revenue System 49
  • 6 - What Disposition Shall Be Made Of The Money? 61
  • 7 - Great Objects Of The State's Charity 74
  • 8 - Depriving A Whole Race 86
  • 9 - Rich Man's War 99
  • 10 - Rich Man's Fight 110
  • 11 - Confederate Context 121
  • 12 - Power And Policy 131
  • 13 - Freed Men And Citizens 140
  • 14 - All The Children Of The State 152
  • 15 - Higher Education For A New South 160
  • 16 - Railroads, Debt, And Reconstruction 170
  • 17 - A Tax Base Without Slaves 183
  • 18 - Conscripts, Convicts, And Good Roads 196
  • Epilogue: From Eighteenth Century To Twentieth 208
  • Essay On Primary Sources 215
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 273
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