From Slave South to New South: Public Policy in Nineteenth-Century Georgia

By Peter Wallenstein | Go to book overview

NOTES

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN NOTES
ActsActs of the General Assembly
ADD Georgia Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, Annual Report
AU Trevor Arnett Library, Atlanta University Center, Atlanta
BTMBoard of Trustees' Minutes
CGComptroller General, Annual Report
CRSGCandler, Confederate Records of the State of Georgia
EU Robert W. Woodruff Library, Emory University, Atlanta
"FSSTNS" Wallenstein, "From Slave South to New South"
GAB Georgia Academy for the Blind, Annual Report
GDAHGeorgia Department of Archives and History, Atlanta
GRGeorgia Reports
GSL Georgia State Library, Atlanta
ICMInferior Court Minutes
JHRJournal of the House of Representatives
JSJournal of the Senate
LALunatic Asylum of the State of Georgia, Annual Report
mfmmicrofilm
MSRMilledgeville Southern Recorder
NANational Archives
PENPenitentiary, Report
SCMSuperior Court Minutes
SCSState Commissioner of Schools, Report
Treas.Treasurer, Report
UGA University of Georgia

NOTES ON STATE RECORDS:

When the Acts, JHR, or JS are cited, the date(s) in parentheses denote the legislative session.

In the reports of state officers and institutions -- ADD, CG, GAB, LA, PEN, and Treas.--the date(s) in parentheses indicate the fiscal year(s) covered in the report.

Some reports are numbered; in those cases, the number precedes the date.

References are to Georgia unless another state is specified.


NOTES ON FEDERAL RECORDS:

Volumes of U.S. Statutes at Large are cited by title and volume number.

Published census materials are cited by volume title, but they appear in the bibliography under U.S. Census Bureau.

-219-

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From Slave South to New South: Public Policy in Nineteenth-Century Georgia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps, Figures, and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Society And Politics 7
  • 2 - State Power And Tax-Free Finance 23
  • 3 - The Accommodation Of The Public 32
  • 4 - Tax Upon The Time And Labor Of Our Citizens 40
  • 5 - Creating A New Revenue System 49
  • 6 - What Disposition Shall Be Made Of The Money? 61
  • 7 - Great Objects Of The State's Charity 74
  • 8 - Depriving A Whole Race 86
  • 9 - Rich Man's War 99
  • 10 - Rich Man's Fight 110
  • 11 - Confederate Context 121
  • 12 - Power And Policy 131
  • 13 - Freed Men And Citizens 140
  • 14 - All The Children Of The State 152
  • 15 - Higher Education For A New South 160
  • 16 - Railroads, Debt, And Reconstruction 170
  • 17 - A Tax Base Without Slaves 183
  • 18 - Conscripts, Convicts, And Good Roads 196
  • Epilogue: From Eighteenth Century To Twentieth 208
  • Essay On Primary Sources 215
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 273
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