Wesleyan's First Century: With an Account of the Centennial Celebration

By Carl F. Price | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
BRADFORD P. RAYMOND, PHILOSOPHER

OF Wesleyan's ten presidents during the first century the longest term of office was that of Bradford Paul Raymond. Veteran of the Civil War, able scholar, specializing in philosophy, pastor and teacher, he was called from the presidency of his alma mater, Lawrence University, in Appleton, Wisconsin, to become the eighth president of Wesleyan University. His administration during almost two decades rounded out the Period of Strengthening by more than doubling the endowment funds, erecting four major buildings, advancing the college in scholarship and faculty and in general prestige, so that Wesleyan at the close of his presidency was well buttressed to sustain the higher superstructure which came in the Period of Expansion, following 1909.

Doctor Raymond was one of the ten children of a New England farmer, Lewis Raymond, and was born in High Ridge, Connecticut, April 22, 1846, on the farm which had been in the family since a former generation. To this father, vigorous in mind, the leader of a local debating society, and influential in politics, he owed his later intense patriotism and interest in public questions. To his godly mother, Mrs. Sallie A. Raymond, he owed his deeply religious spirit. The only education he could afford as a boy was secured at the district school in High Ridge. When the Civil War broke out, he was eager to go, but was compelled to wait until he was eighteen years old, when he joined the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York. During the Fort Fisher Campaign, when he was serving in the Commissary Department, he was seized with malarial fever and spent much time in the hospital. A year later, at the close of the war, 1865, he returned home, broken in health and trembling with malarial chills.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wesleyan's First Century: With an Account of the Centennial Celebration
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 384

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.