Unions before the Bar: Historic Trials Showing the Evolution of Labor Rights in the United States

By Elias Lieberman | Go to book overview

- 7 -
The "Yellov-Dog" Contract (1907-1917)

HITCHMAN COAL AND COKE COMPANY V. MITCHELL

I

By the turn of the twentieth century some employers in the United States had revived an old scheme for warding off unionization in their plants. This scheme consisted of exacting from employees a promise not to belong to a union and not to strike or participate in any collective action against the employer during the entire period of employment. Without such a promise a worker would not be given employment. In some cases the promise was merely oral; in others the promise was embodied in a so-called contract, which the worker had to sign on the dotted line if he wanted the job. The socalled "contract" promised nothing to the worker by way of either terms of employment or period of employment. The employer was free to discharge the worker at will. The worker, likewise, was free to quit his job, but he was not free to join a union and keep his job.

This strategy nipped unionization in the bud. A worker who declined to sign such a contract was not given the job and a worker who did sign was afraid to join the union and lose the job. This type of contract became known as the "yellow-dog" contract. For many years the yellow-dog contract was the theme song of the antilabor employer chorus and was used to block unionization. Labor's efforts to organize were seriously hampered. The United Mine Workers probably more than any other union, suffered from this contract scheme. The legality of the yellow-dog contract was tested in the Hitchman Coal and Coke Company v. Mitchell case.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unions before the Bar: Historic Trials Showing the Evolution of Labor Rights in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.