Martin's History of France: The Age of Louis XIV - Vol. 2

By Henri Martin; Mary L. Booth | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.
LOUIS XIV. (CONTINUED.)

WAR OF THE LEAGUE OF AUGSBURG. Conquest of the left Bank of the Rhine. ENGLISH REVOLUTION. England and Holland united under William of Orange. Declaration of War against Holland and Spain. Devastation of the Palatinate. France loses a Part of the Rhenish Provinces. England declares War against France. War in Ireland. Retreat of Pelletier. Pontchartrain, Comptroller-General. Disorder of the Finances and Aggravation of the Public Burdens. Victory of Luxembourg at Fleurus. The Duke of Savoy declares against France. Victory of Catinat at Stafford. Talents and Activity of Seignelai. Victory of TOURVILLE at Beachy-Head over the Anglo-Batavian Fleet. Glory of the French Navy. Death of Seignelai. The Navy confided to Pontchartrain. The Battle of the Boyne. James II. abandons Ireland. Defence of Limerick. Taking of Mons. Combat of Leuse. Conquest of Nice and Savoy. Battle of Aghrim. Close of the War in Ireland. Irish Emigration to France. Death of Louvois. His Son Barbezieux succeeds him. Immense Display of Military Force. Project of invading England. Reverse of La Hogue exaggerated by Tradition. Taking of Namur. Victory of Steenkerke. Invasion of Dauphiny by the Duke of Savoy. Immense Losses of English and Dutch Commerce. La Hogue avenged. The French Privateers. Jean Bart. Duguai-Trouin. Louis XIV. misses the Chance of defeating William III. Victory of Neerwinden. Taking of Charleroi. Victory of Marseilles. Madame de Maintenon, Beauvilliers, and FÉNELON. Misery in France. Pacific Dispositions inspired in Louis XIV. Sweden and Denmark offer their Mediation. Moderate Offers of Louis XIV. rejected. Compromise between France and the Court of Rome. Louis XIV. recoils. Vain Attacks of the Anglo-Batavians against our Ports. Victory of the Ter and Conquests in Catalonia. Financial Situation of France and England. Establishment of great Economic and Financial Institutions in England. France reduced to Expedients and Empiricism. Loss of Namur and Casale. The Duke of Savoy treats with France. Savoy and Nice are returned to him, and Pignerol is ceded to him. Neutrality of Italy. Negotiations. Congress of Ryswick. Reconciliation between Louis XIV. and William III. Taking of Ath. Taking of Barcelona. Sack of Carthagena. Peace of Ryswick. France restores all her recent Conquests and all the Additions to her Territory subsequent to the Peace of Nimeguen, save Strasburg and the Domains of Alsace.


1688-1697.

THE joy manifested by the great adversary of Louis XIV., William of Orange, at the news of the siege of Philippsburg, showed the magnitude of the error into which Louvois had led his master. William saw the overthrow of the last obstacle that could

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Martin's History of France: The Age of Louis XIV - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 543

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.