Martin's History of France: The Age of Louis XIV - Vol. 2

By Henri Martin; Mary L. Booth | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
LOUIS XIV. (CONCLUSION.)

WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION, continued and concluded. Chamillart replaced by Viosin. Loss of Tournay. Glorious Defeat of Malplaquet. Loss of Mons. Conference of Gertruydenberg. The Allies endeavor to force Louis XIV. to dethrone alone Philip V. Loss of Douai, Bethune, Aire, and Saint-Venant. Defeat of PhilipV. at Saragoess. The Allies reënter Madrid. Vendôme in Spain. Victory of Villa Vicioss. The Allies repulsed in Catalonia. Loss of Bouchain. Ministerial Revolution at London. Negotiation with England. Death of the Emperor Joseph I. The Pretender of Spain becomes the Emperor CharlesVI. Death of the Dauphin and the DUKE OF BURGUNDY. Desolation of the Royal House. Last Days of Fénelon. The Emperor and Holland refusing to treat, England withdraws from the Coalition. Loss of Quesnoy. Victory of VILLARS over Eugene at DENAIN. Recapture of Dousi, Quesnoy, and Bouchain. Treaty of Utrecht with England, Holland, Savoy, etc. Newfoundland, Hudson's Bay, Nova Scotia, and St. Christopher ceded to the English. The Port of Dunkirk filled up. Furness, Ypres, Trounay, etc. ceded as the Barrier of the Dutch. Lille, Bethune, Aire, and Saint-Venant restored to France. Philip V. retains Spain and the Indies. The Duke of Savoy becomes King of Sicily. War continued with the Emperor. Retaking of Landau. Taking of Freiburg. Peace of Rastadt with the Emperor. France keeps Strasburg and Landau. The Emperor keeps Naples, Milan, and Belgium. Catalonia alone continues to defend itself. Taking of Barcelona. End of the WAR OF SUCCESSION. State of Finances. Partial Bankruptcies. Religious Persecutions. Unigenitus Bull. Edicts against the Protestants. Testament and Death of the KING.


1709-1715.

THE negotiations of the Hague showed clearly enough that the abasement and mutilation of France could alone satisfy the allies; France was to expect her safety only from her courage and her despair. But courage required the instruments of battle, and the government of Louis XIV. knew not, we will not say how it could reconquer its lost places, but how it could subsist an army: to live in 1708, it had been necessary to consume the future; to live in 1709, a kind of miracle was now needed, to use the expression of the comptroller-general himself. Spain, which had caused us so many ills, indirectly furnished us unexpected aid: French vessels, that traded to the Spanish Indies, landed in the spring, in our

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