Diary in America: With Remarks on Its Institutions

By Frederick Marryat | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

IN PREPARING THIS EDITION of Frederick Marryat A Diary in America with Remarks on Its Institutions I should like to express my thanks to the following: to Mr. Oliver Warner for permission to quote from his Captain Marryat, a Rediscovery ( London: Constable and Co.; 1953); to Mr. Tatton Anfield for providing facilities to do much of the initial editorial work; to Dr. Willard Ireland and his associates of the Provincial Government Library in Victoria, British Columbia; to Miss Alice H. Bonnell of the Columbiana Library of Columbia University, New York; to Mr. P. R. Franton of the British Museum; to Miss Iva Foster and her associates of the Coram Library, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine; to Messrs. Edward C. Smith, Edward R. Scott, David Redding, and David L. Williams for their helpful advice and criticism; to Messrs. Henry Robbins and Patrick Gregory of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., for their generous assistance and guidance in the preparation of the manuscript as a whole and of the introduction in particular; to Mr. Walter M. Whitehill, Director of the Boston Athenaeum, for his enthusiastic support of the project and for many kindnesses during the preparation of the manuscript; to Miss Judy Hollenbach for clerical assistance. In addition I should like to express very particular thanks to Dr. Ernest P. Muller, without whose assistance I should never have been able to do this edition of Marryat. Dr. Muller interrupted his own work to give me the benefit of his knowledge of Marryat's period whenever I sought him out. Further, Dr. Muller most generously permitted me to use his excellent collection of early nineteenth-century Americana, which was essential for the preparation of the notes.

S. W. J.

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Lewiston, Maine

-xxvii-

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