Cold War Diplomacy: American Foreign Policy, 1945-1960

By Norman A. Graebner | Go to book overview

The world is not static, and the status quo is not sacred. But we cannot allow changes in the status quo in violation of the Charter of the United Nations by such methods as coercion, or by such subterfuges as political infiltration. In helping free and independent nations to maintain their freedom, the United States will be giving effect to the principles of the Charter of the United Nations. . . .

Should we fail to aid Greece and Turkey in this fateful hour, the effect will be far reaching to the West as well as to the East. We must take immediate and resolute action. . . .


-- Document No. 5 --
MARSHALL'S SPEECH AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY, JUNE 5, 19475

In this speech Secretary of State George C. Marshall not only argued for an expanded economic aid program for Europe but also, with the advice of the Policy Planning Staff of the State Department, attempted to extricate American foreign policy from the ideological context to which the Truman Doctrine had consigned it. Marshall made it clear that United States economic aid, under the new program, would be aimed at poverty and economic dislocation, not at any ideology or nation.

I need not tell you gentlemen that the world situation is very serious. That must be apparent to all intelligent people. I think one difficulty is that the problem is one

____________________
5
Raymond Dennett and Robert K. Turner (eds.), Documents on American Foreign Relations, January 1-December 31, 1947 (Vol. IX, Princeton, 1949), pp. 1-11.

-152-

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