Cold War Diplomacy: American Foreign Policy, 1945-1960

By Norman A. Graebner | Go to book overview

gone, relationships which at their worst were exploitations, and which at their best were paternalism. That relationship is over, and the relationship of east and west must now be in the Far East one of mutual respect and mutual helpfulness. We are their friends. Others are their friends. We and those others are willing to help, but we can help only where we are wanted and only where the conditions of help are really sensible and possible. So what we can see is that this new day in Asia, this new day which is dawning, may go on to a glorious noon or it may darken and it may drizzle out. But that decision lies within the countries of Asia and within the power of the Asian people. It is not a decision which a friend or even an enemy from the outside can decide for them.


Document No. 8
DULLES' STATEMENT ON LIBERATION, JANUARY 15, 19538

John Foster Dulles first publicized his concept of liberation in his article, "A Policy of Boldness," Life, May 19, 1952. This concept he then wrote into the Republican platform of 1952. When he appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee the following January, prior to becoming Secretary of State, he insisted that the liberation of China and the Soviet satellites could be achieved without war or even revolution. Precisely how he hoped to achieve this he never stated, either here or elsewhere.

____________________
8
Hearing before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Eighty-Third Congress, First Session, on the Nomination of John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State- Designate, January 15, 1953 ( Washington, 1953), pp. 5-6.

-164-

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