Cold War Diplomacy: American Foreign Policy, 1945-1960

By Norman A. Graebner | Go to book overview

doubt seems by himself to be helpless in this struggle. But their aspirations in the aggregate make up a mighty force. There are signs that the rulers are bending to some of the human desires of their people. There are promises of more food, more household goods, more economic freedom.

That does not prove that the Soviet rulers have themselves been converted. It is rather that they may be dimly perceiving a basic fact, that is that there are limits to the power of any rulers indefinitely to suppress the human spirit. In that God-given fact lies our greatest hope. It is a hope that can sustain us. For even if the path ahead be long and hard, it need not be a warlike path; and we can know that at the end may be found the blessedness of peace.


-- Document No.10--
ALASTAIR BUCHAN'S ARGUMENT FOR GRADUATED DETERRENCE, DECEMBER 1, 195510

After its formal announcement in January, 1954, the doctrine of "massive retaliation" was subjected to so much critical analysis by both British and American writers that even Mr. Dulles was forced to rnodify his original statement and bury some of the questions raised with an appeal to secrecy. Alastair Buchan, the English writer, here criticises the doctrine's ineffectiveness in preventing small wars, especially after the Russians achieved nuclear parity as recognized by the Geneva summit conference of July, 1955. To him the West required a "graduated deterrence"

____________________
10
Alastair Buchan, "Toward A New Strategy of Graduated Deterrence," The Reporter, December 1, 1955, pp. 23-28. Copyright 1955 by The Reporter Magazine Company.

-171-

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