The Bolivarian Presidents: Conversations and Correspondence with Presidents of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela

By Robert J. Alexander | Go to book overview

Further Reading

Several of the people dealt with in this volume have themselves written books of interest to those wishing to know more about them. Others have been the subject of biographies. In still other cases, somewhat broader-based studies contain relevant material on the Bolivarian presidents who are interviewed and corresponded with in the present volume.

There are entries on most of our subjects in the Bibliographical Dictionary of Latin America and Caribbean Politics, edited by Robert J. Alexander, and published by Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 1988.


BOLIVIA

The two standard studies of the Bolivian National Revolution, in which most of our Bolivian presidents played roles of greater or less consequence are Robert J. Alexander The Bolivian National Revolution, published by Rutgers University Press in 1958, and James Malloy Bolivia: The Uncompleted Revolution, put out by University of Pittsburgh Press in 1971. The story is extended through the 1960s and 1970s by Bolivia: Past, Present and Future of Its Politics, by Robert J. Alexander, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1982. Finally, James Dunkerley chapter on "The Crisis of the Bolivian Revolution" in The Latin American Left from the Fall of Allende to Perestroika, published by Westview Press, Boulder, 1993, deals with the second periods of Victor Paz Estenssoro and Hernán Siles in power in the 1980s.

The only published biography of Victor Paz Estenssoro of which I am aware is that written by José Fellman Velarde, Victor Paz Estenssoro, El Hombre y la Revolución, published in La Paz in 1955, during Paz Estenssoro's first administration.

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The Bolivarian Presidents: Conversations and Correspondence with Presidents of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Bolivia 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Peru 95
  • Introduction 95
  • Ecuador 113
  • Introduction 113
  • Colombia 127
  • Introduction 127
  • Venezuela 141
  • Introduction 141
  • Further Reading 253
  • Index 257
  • About the Author 285
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