The Antitrust Laws of the United States of America: A Study of Competition Enforced by Law

By A. D. Neale | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
BACKGROUND AND DEFINITIONS: THE AIM AND SCOPE OF ANTITRUST

I. Object of the study?

The antitrust laws of the United States of America are unique in scope of content and rigour of enforcement. In no other country is there an equivalent body of statute law dealing with monopolies and restrictive business practices.1 At the same time it is widely conceded that the United States is pre-eminent in the power and drive of her industry and commerce. It is natural, therefore, to infer some connexion between economic success and the existence of this special body of law.

Connexion is, of course, more than conjunction; post hoc ergo propter hoc is a notorious fallacy. Even the most ardent of American 'trustbusters' would hardly claim that these laws are the sole or even the main cause of their country's high place in economic achievement. But many well-qualified persons in the United States do, in fact, believe that the antitrust laws make an important contribution to economic health; other countries have frequently been enjoined by spokesmen of the United States, both official and unofficial, to introduce similar laws and, as it is often put, 'enjoy the benefits of competition'.

It is a mistake to think that outsiders are invariably wrong about what is good for us, so that this strongly held American opinion is at least a good reason for getting to know something about the antitrust laws and the way they work.

There are other reasons besides urging from outside for interest in the subject. The performance of the British economy is by common consent a more critical matter in these days than formerly. Shortcomings, whether real or fancied, arouse a lively concern; and the effect of restrictive business practices on efficiency is one of the topics most often discussed. Successive legislative measures in Britain since the Second World War have reflected a consensus of opinion that private arrangements which suppress competition may go too far and

____________________
1
Canada's Combines Investigation Act (together with the related sections of the Criminal Code of Canada) comes nearest; in theory, indeed, this statute is as broad as the sherman Act and, with its heavier criminal penalties and specific prohibition of resale price maintenance, is in some respects even more strenuous. But, because of differences in the legal processes employed, the interpretations of the courts and the resources available for enforcement, the end-result in Canada is markedly less rigorous.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Antitrust Laws of the United States of America: A Study of Competition Enforced by Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 516

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.