The Age of Atonement: The Influence of Evangelicalism on Social and Economic Thought, 1785-1865

By Boyd Hilton | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I have incurred so many debts during the long preparation of this book that it is hard to know where my thanks should begin. Perhaps with the many hundreds of pupils who have had the argument in its successive versions foisted on them, and whose creative scepticism has helped me gradually to refine it. Very special thanks must go to Pietro Corsi, Colin Matthew, and Anthony Waterman. Among scores of other scholars from whose advice this book has benefited are Derek Beales, Richard Brent, David Carruthers, the late Sydney Checkland, Maurice Cowling, Bianco Fontana, Lawrence Goldman, Michael Hennell, Istvan Hont, Angus Macintyre, John Mason, Michael Murphy, Tim Morgan, Margaret Pelling, Robert Robson, Martin Rudwick, the late Eric Stokes, Norman Stone, Steven Swartzman, William Thomas, Stephen Taylor, David Thompson, and John Walsh. For permission to quote from manuscript materials in their possession I wish to thank: The Duke of Northumberland, The Earl of Harewood, Viscount Sidmouth, Sir Charles Graham, Bt., the Trustees of the British Library, the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland, the Trustees of the National Library of Wales, the Syndics of Cambridge University Library, the Edinburgh University Library and New College Library, Edinburgh, the Huntington Library, San Marino, California, His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Trustees of Lambeth Palace Library, the John Rylands University Library of Manchester, the Provost and Fellows of Oriel College, Oxford, the William R. Perkins Library, North Carolina, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge, and the Librarian of University College London. For instruction in and help with word processing, my thanks are due to Laura Cordy, and for help with day-to-day scholarship, to many scores of librarians but especially Rachel Clifford and Janice Fairholm of the Cambridge University Library. Most of all I thank my wife Mary and my children Thomas, Eliza, and Zoë, to whom the time which I have spent on 'the Atonement' (as they affectionately call it) has indeed seemed like 'an Age'.

Trinity College, Cambridge

-xi-

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