Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus

By Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley | Go to book overview

acquitted myself to admiration. I must own I felt a little proud
when my captain offered me the second dignity in the vessel,
and entreated me to remain with the greatest earnestness; so
valuable did he consider my services.

And now, dear Margaret, do I not deserve to accomplish
some great purpose? My life might have been passed in ease
and luxury; but I preferred glory to every enticement that
wealth placed in my path. Oh, that some encouraging voice
would answer in the affirmative! My courage and my resolution
is firm; but my hopes fluctuate and my spirits are often de-
pressed. I am about to proceed on a long and difficult voyage,
the emergencies of which will demand all my fortitude: I am
required not only to raise the spirits of others, but sometimes
to sustain my own, when theirs are failing.

This is the most favourable period for travelling in Russia.
They fly quickly over the snow in their sledges; the motion is
pleasant, and, in my opinion, far more agreeable than that of
an English stage-coach. The cold is not excessive, if you are
wrapped in furs -- a dress which I have already adopted; for
there is a great difference between walking the deck and re-
maining seated motionless for hours, when no exercise prevents
the blood from actually freezing in your veins. I have no ambi-
tion to lose my life on the post-road between St. Petersburgh
and Archangel.

I shall depart for the latter town in a fortnight or three
weeks; and my intention is to hire a ship there, which can easily
be done by paying the insurance for the owner, and to engage
as many sailors as I think necessary among those who are ac-
customed to the whale-fishing. I do not intend to sail until the
month of June; and when shall I return? Ah, dear sister, how
can I answer this question? If I succeed, many, many months,
perhaps years, will pass before you and I may meet. If I fail,
you will see me again soon, or never.

Farewell, my dear, excellent Margaret. Heaven shower down
blessings on you, and save me, that I may again and again
testify my gratitude for all your love and kindness. -- Your
affectionate brother,

R. WALTON.

-15-

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Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction- (to the 1831 Edition) 7
  • Letter 1 13
  • Letter 2 16
  • Letter 3 19
  • Letter 4 20
  • Chapter 1 27
  • Chapter 2 31
  • Chapter 3 36
  • Chapter 4 42
  • Chapter 5 48
  • Chapter 6 54
  • Chapter 7 60
  • Chapter 8 69
  • Chapter 9 76
  • Chapter 10 81
  • Chapter 11 87
  • Chapter 12 93
  • Chapter 13 98
  • Chapter 14 103
  • Chapter 15 108
  • Chapter 16 115
  • Chapter 17 122
  • Chapter 18 127
  • Chapter 19 134
  • Chapter 20 140
  • Chapter 21 148
  • Chapter 22 157
  • Chapter 23 165
  • Chapter 24 171
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