Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus

By Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley | Go to book overview

picture. Continue for the present to write to me by every op-
portunity: I may receive your letters on some occasions when
I need them most to support my spirits. I love you very ten-
derly. Remember me with affection, should you never hear
from me again. -- Your affectionate brother,

ROBERT WALTON.


Letter 3

To Mrs. Saville, England

JULY 7TH, 17 --.

MY DEAR SISTER, -- I write a few lines in haste, to say that I am
safe, and well advanced on my voyage. This letter will reach
England by a merchantman now on its homeward voyage from
Archangel; more fortunate than I, who may not see my native
land, perhaps, for many years. I am, however, in good spirits:
my men are bold, and apparently firm of purpose; nor do the
floating sheets of ice that continually pass us, indicating the
dangers of the region towards which we are advancing, appear
to dismay them. We have already reached a very high latitude;
but it is the height of summer, and although not so warm as in
England, the southern gales, which blow us speedily towards
those shores which I so ardently desire to attain, breathe a
degree of renovating warmth which I had not expected.

No incidents have hitherto befallen us that would make a
figure in a letter. One or two stiff gales, and the springing of a
leak, are accidents which experienced navigators scarcely re-
member to record; and I shall be well content if nothing worse
happened to us during our voyage.

Adieu, my dear Margaret. Be assured that for my own sake,
as well as yours, I will not rashly encounter danger. I will be
cool, persevering, and prudent.

But success shall crown my endeavours. Wherefore not?
Thus far I have gone, tracing a secure way over the pathless
seas: the very stars themselves being witnesses and testimonies
of my triumph. Why not still proceed over the untamed yet
obedient element? What can stop the determined heart and re-
solved will of man?

-19-

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Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction- (to the 1831 Edition) 7
  • Letter 1 13
  • Letter 2 16
  • Letter 3 19
  • Letter 4 20
  • Chapter 1 27
  • Chapter 2 31
  • Chapter 3 36
  • Chapter 4 42
  • Chapter 5 48
  • Chapter 6 54
  • Chapter 7 60
  • Chapter 8 69
  • Chapter 9 76
  • Chapter 10 81
  • Chapter 11 87
  • Chapter 12 93
  • Chapter 13 98
  • Chapter 14 103
  • Chapter 15 108
  • Chapter 16 115
  • Chapter 17 122
  • Chapter 18 127
  • Chapter 19 134
  • Chapter 20 140
  • Chapter 21 148
  • Chapter 22 157
  • Chapter 23 165
  • Chapter 24 171
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