The London Stock Exchange: A History

By Ranald C. Michie | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book was initiated by Sir Nicholas Goodison who suggested the idea of an independent and authoritative history of the London Stock Exchange. It was he who arranged access to the records still held--and used--by the Stock Exchange. Without his support this book would never have been written but he is not responsible for the views expressed here. They are mine and mine alone, though Sir Nicholas did share his knowledge of the 1980s with me. Similarly, though the Stock Exchange made available whatever I wanted to see, and I found the Council Minutes all I could manage, they have neither vetted nor commented on anything I have written. This is not an official history and I thank Sir Andrew Hugh Smith and Sir John Kemp-Welch--successive Chairmen of the London Stock Exchange for both their willingness to grant access and, even more, their ability not to try and influence. Louise Anstead was responsible for providing me with a room to work in and the volumes to work on, and I am very grateful to her. The Guildhall Library staff provided me with all the other original and secondary material with their usual efficiency. I conducted the research myself and so have no assistant(s) to thank! I also financed the research trips to London myself but am very grateful to the University of Durham for giving me a Sir Derman Christopherson fellowship for a year. That allowed me to write up my findings. I would like to record my thanks to David Kynaston for the use of his published and unpublished work, as it provides that human element that my own lacks. In addition, I would also like to thank Melissa Handley for all her hard work in producing the index. Finally, my wife and family have had to put up with a great deal while I worked on this book but, probably, less than the office staff in the Department of History at Durham University. This is probably the last book I will write for, after this one, Wendy and Tracy refuse to type another! I am very grateful that they have typed this one!

Ranald C. Michie

Durham

1998

-vi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The London Stock Exchange: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Figures and Tables xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - From Market to Exchange, 1693-1801 15
  • 2 - From Money to Capital, 1801-1851 37
  • 3 - From Domestic to International, 1850-1914 70
  • 4 - Shattered Dominance: The First World War, 1914-1918 143
  • 5 - Challenges and Opportunities, 1919-1939 170
  • 6 - The Changing Market Place Between the Wars 235
  • 7 - New Beginnings: The Second World War, 1939-1945 287
  • 8 - Recovery and Crisis: 1945-1949 326
  • 9 - Drifting Towards Oblivion, 1950-1959 363
  • 10 - Failing to Adjust, 1960-1969 423
  • 11 - Prelude to Change, 1970-1979 479
  • 12 - Big Bang 543
  • 13 - Black Hole 596
  • Conclusion 636
  • Select Bibliography 643
  • Index 655
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 674

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.