What World Religions Teach

By E. G. Parrinder | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
ISLAM: (1) PPOPHET AND CALIPHS

The great stream of religious thought that comes from the Semitic and Western world, quite independently of the parallel stream that flows from India, arose in Palestine and Arabia. Judaism and Christianity, and then Islam, are the great monotheistic religions, believing in one God, righteous in his nature and universal in his claims. Islam was the latest of this group, but its religious inspiration was largely original to itself. It will be dealt with first, because it is still an Oriental and unknown religion to most Westerners. Judaism and Christianity are familiar to us, and they will be studied in the light of all the other religions.


MUHAMMAD

Muhammad (formerly misspelt Mahomet or Mohammed) lived in Arabia in the sixth century A.D. Arabia, 'the island of the Arabs,' is the world's largest peninsula. Much of it is desert, and most important historically, are the uplands of the west, where are trading towns and religious centres.

Mecca was a sanctuary and place of pilgrimage long before the time of Muhammad. It contains the Kaaba ('cube') shrine, a small sanctuary said in later Muslim legend to have been built by Abraham and Ishmael. In the wall of the Kaaba is embedded the Black Stone, probably an aerolite which in falling from the sky was regarded as holy in prehistoric times. Pilgrims to Mecca still kiss this stone as part of the ritual of pilgrimage. There is also a sacred well, Zamzam, said to have been the well revealed to Hagar and Ishmael, whose waters are holy.

From time immemorial Mecca has been visited for its holy objects. It also contained many idols of pagan gods and goddesses,

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
What World Religions Teach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.