Making Campaigns Count: Leadership and Coalition-Building in 1980

By Darrell M. West | Go to book overview

through these tactics were quite consistent. Instead of being expedient, manipulative, or inconsistent, they were mutually reinforcing. In chapter 7, I investigate feedback mechanisms and suggest a reason for the lack of policy discussions in presidential campaigns. Candidates do not discuss policy because, relative to other topics, audiences do not reward them for doing so. Finally, in chapter 8, I conclude the research by discussing the broader links between campaigns and governance. Do campaign activities help us predict leader behavior? Is there a relation between presidential campaigns and the policy process? And does this research tell us anything about political leadership and coalition-building, particularly in regard to the election of Ronald Reagan? For those readers who seek a chronological account of the campaign, I list the campaign's major events from 1978 to 1981 (Appendix III) and election results from the nominating process (Appendix IV) and general election (Appendix V).


NOTES
1.
Personal interview with Richard Wirthlin, February 19, 1981. In the following chapters, all quotations come from personal interviews listed in Appendix I unless otherwise attributed.
2.
The Michel quote comes from Irwin Arieff, "Bowing to Reagan's Wishes, Lawmakers Took Bold Steps to Reduce Government Role," Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report, 39, no. 51 ( December 19, 1981), p. 2507; Baker's statement is cited in David Hess , "Congress Has Ended New Deal," Philadelphia Inquirer ( December 18, 1981), p. 6A.
3.
William Riker, A Theory of Political Coalitions ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1962).
4.
Robert Axelrod, "Where the Votes Come From," in Jeff Fishel, ed., Parties and Elections in an Anti-Party Age ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1978), pp. 86- 99. Also see John Petrocik, Party Coalitions ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981).
5.
The classic in this area is Nelson Polsby and Aaron Wildavsky, Presidential Elections, 5th ed. ( New York: Scribners, 1980).
6.
V. O. Key, "Secular Realignment and the Party System," Journal of Politics, 21 ( May, 1959), pp. 198-210 and "A Theory of Critical Elections," Journal of Politics, 17 ( February, 1955), pp. 3-18; James Sundquist, Dynamics of the Party System ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1973).
7.
Paul Abramson, John Aldrich, and David Rohde, Change and Continuity in the 1980 Elections ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1982).
8.
Richard Fenno, Home Style ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1978).
9.
Xandra Kayden, Campaign Organization ( Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath, 1978) and Polsby and Wildavsky, Presidential Elections.
10.
Robert Agranoff, The New Style in Election Campaigns ( Boston: Holbrook Press, 1972) and Larry Sabato, The Rise of Political Consultants ( New York: Basic Books, 1981).
11.
Walter Dean Burnham, Critical Elections and the Mainsprings of American Politics ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1970).

-12-

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Making Campaigns Count: Leadership and Coalition-Building in 1980
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments iv
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Introduction 3
  • Notes 12
  • 2- The Changing Nature of Presidential Campaigns 15
  • Notes 34
  • 3- Candidates and Electoral Coalitions 39
  • Notes 62
  • 4campaign Rhetoric and the Political Agenda 69
  • Notes 92
  • 5- Constituencies and the Allocation Of Travel Time 97
  • Notes 114
  • 6- The Role of Political Symbolism 117
  • Notes 131
  • 7- Candidate Presentations and Audience Reactions 133
  • Notes 148
  • 8- Campaigns and Governance: Predicting Presidential Behavior 151
  • Notes 161
  • Appendixes 163
  • Notes 174
  • Bibliographical Essay 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 199
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