Making Campaigns Count: Leadership and Coalition-Building in 1980

By Darrell M. West | Go to book overview

tested nominations, dark horse candidates, and third party challengers are healthy developments because they broaden the political agenda and reinvigorate the party system. Perhaps the greatest threat to the American political system today is not the open nominating process but public apathy, mistrust, and cynicism. Voting turnout has declined to its lowest level in decades. Public confidence in political leaders and government institutions is not exceptionally high. To the extent that the new electoral system brings candidates to the forefront, places ideas on the political agenda, and gives voters a choice between meaningful options, we should applaud and cherish that system.


NOTES
1.
James David Barber, The Presidential Character: Predicting Performance in the White House ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1972).
2.
Barber also distinguished "passive-positives" (those with high needs for approval) from "passive-negatives" (leaders serving out of a sense of duty).
3.
In fact, the typology has gained such popular acceptance that some candidates have maneuvered for the favored "active-positive" designation.
4.
For more extensive critiques, see Jeffrey Tulis, "On Presidential Character," in Joseph Bessette and Jeffrey Tulis, eds., The Presidency in a Constitutional Order ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 1981) and Marjorie Hershey, Running for Office ( Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House, forthcoming).
5.
Ceaser, Presidential Selection.
6.
Page, Choices and Echoes in Presidential Elections.
7.
Kuklinski and West, "Economic Expectations and Voting Behavior in United States House and Senate Elections."
8.
Gary Jacobson and Samuel Kernell, Strategy and Choice in Congressional Elections ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1981).
9.
Fishel, From Presidential Promise to Performance.
10.
Pomper, Elections in America; Kessel, "The Seasons of Presidential Politics"; and Ginsberg, The Consequences of Consent.
11.
Theodore Lowi, The End of Liberalism, 2nd ed. ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1979).
12.
For summaries of these works, see Robert Putnam, The Comparative Study of Political Elites ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1976) and Kenneth Prewitt and Alan Stone, The Ruling Elites ( New York: Harper and Row, 1973).
13.
James MacGregor Burns, Leadership ( New York: Harper and Row, 1978). See also Robert Tucker, Politics as Leadership ( Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1981) and William Welsh, Leaders and Elites ( New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1979).
14.
Tucker, Politics as Leadership, p. 114.
15.
Warren Miller, "Policy Directions and Presidential Leadership: Alternative Interpretations of the 1980 Presidential Election," paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, New York, September 3-6, 1981 and Arthur Miller and Martin Wattenberg, "Policy and Performance Voting in the 1980 Election," paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, New York, September 3-6, 1981. Of course, one can ask whether elections ever

-161-

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Making Campaigns Count: Leadership and Coalition-Building in 1980
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments iv
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Introduction 3
  • Notes 12
  • 2- The Changing Nature of Presidential Campaigns 15
  • Notes 34
  • 3- Candidates and Electoral Coalitions 39
  • Notes 62
  • 4campaign Rhetoric and the Political Agenda 69
  • Notes 92
  • 5- Constituencies and the Allocation Of Travel Time 97
  • Notes 114
  • 6- The Role of Political Symbolism 117
  • Notes 131
  • 7- Candidate Presentations and Audience Reactions 133
  • Notes 148
  • 8- Campaigns and Governance: Predicting Presidential Behavior 151
  • Notes 161
  • Appendixes 163
  • Notes 174
  • Bibliographical Essay 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 199
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