CHAPTER VIII
A GENERAL SURVEY

Page references to Farmer's collected edition of the plays.

IT REMAINS TO BE PROVED THAT HEYWOOD WAS NO hand-to-mouth plagiarist, but a regular pupil of the French stage. Since this conclusion must rest rather upon broad impression than exact inference, the evidence must be treated with caution and considered as a whole. Any brisk and sophisticated talent might, by contrast with the bulk of early Tudor work, appear to have been formed in a French school, and might indeed have acquired many French traits at second-hand. Without a definite source, we can seldom be sure that direct foreign influence exists; but, whatever the difficulty of establishing particular points of contact, a general conclusion seems inescapable. Heywood's dramatic work as a whole is in debt to the farces, and his knowledge of them was considerably greater than his proved debts would suggest.

To begin with, his whole conception of drama--and it is in this that he differs most notably from his contemporaries --leans towards that of the French playwrights. This is, of course, true of the three plays--John, Pardoner, Four PP --which are drawn from French originals or obviously 'cast in the French mould'; but some of the essential characteristics which they share with farce belong to Heywood's theatre as a whole. Of these the most striking is the intention rather to entertain than to instruct. It is true that Love, Four PP and Witty dose with moral or religious homilies, and it may be that Merry Report ( Weather) and No Lover nor Loved ( Love) owe something to the comic tradition of the moralities;1 but all Heywood's theatrical pieces are built upon an incident, a jest or a dispute, and are organically distinct, as

____________________
1
According to Chambers, however, 'the character of the Vice is derived from that of the domestic fool or jester' ( Mediaeval stage, ii. 204).

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
French Farce & John Heywood
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Contents 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter I - The Family of Farce 13
  • Chapter II - The Matter of Farce 24
  • Chapter III - The Art of Farce 37
  • Chapter IV - The Case Stated 49
  • Chapter V - Pernet and John 56
  • Chapter VI - La Farce D'Un Pardonneur, Pardoner and Friar, the Four Pp 70
  • Chapter VII - Le Dialogue Du Fou Et Du Sage and Witty and Witless 87
  • Chapter VIII - A General Survey 97
  • Appendix A - List of Farces 121
  • Books Summarily Cited and Abbreviations 164
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.