APPENDIX A
LIST OF FARCES
This is a list of extant farces (some fragmentary), to which I add a list of four lost farces whose substance is known in some detail. The main list is as full as I can make it, the following omissions excepted:
1. The sotties, though they are generally classed as farces; they are collected in Picot's Recueil général des sotties and in the first volume of the Recueil Trepperel.
2. The large collection of farces which is still interred in a private library in Florence. For further information and a list of titles see the Recueil Trepperel, i. lvii. ff.
3. The seven new farces which are to be published in the Recueil Trepperel, vol. ii. These are briefly described in the introduction to vol. i.
4. Certain fragments. A few scraps are contained in a MS described by A. Thomas in Romania, xxxviii ( 1909), 177 ff.: apart from La mandelette and Lourdinet (which he prints) there is nothing worth inclusion. Other fragments, which I have not seen but understand to be negligible, are mentioned by Æbischer, Trois farces, introduction, p. i. No doubt other shreds and patches exist.

My list is based on that of Petit de Julleville ( Répertoire, pp. 19-20 and 104-258), whom I follow in his numbering and mode of naming the farces. Beneke's list includes some fresh material and some pieces which Petit de Julleville deliberately excludes as non-dramatic. In this matter I have relied, as a rule, on the judgment of the French scholar. Some other farces have since been discovered.

I make no attempt at a complete bibliography. Where a farce has to be hunted for in one or other of several rare editions, the reader should turn at once to the Répertoire (under the number given in my list) for full information. My object is simply to give the handiest references in summary form, and to guide the reader through the well-

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French Farce & John Heywood
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Contents 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter I - The Family of Farce 13
  • Chapter II - The Matter of Farce 24
  • Chapter III - The Art of Farce 37
  • Chapter IV - The Case Stated 49
  • Chapter V - Pernet and John 56
  • Chapter VI - La Farce D'Un Pardonneur, Pardoner and Friar, the Four Pp 70
  • Chapter VII - Le Dialogue Du Fou Et Du Sage and Witty and Witless 87
  • Chapter VIII - A General Survey 97
  • Appendix A - List of Farces 121
  • Books Summarily Cited and Abbreviations 164
  • Index 169
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