A New Deal for Youth: The Story of the National Youth Administration

By Betty Grimes Lindley; Ernest K. Lindley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
A New Deal for Youth

"JUST WHAT IS NYA?"

"I heard about a boy at college who gets some sort of Government scholarship."

"Isn't it the same as the CCC?"

With few exceptions, these were the comments we heard from our friends, from educators, bishops, business men, even from Government people, when we told them: "We are planning to write a book about the National Youth Administration."

We didn't know much about the NYA, ourselves, but we had heard enough to stimulate our curiosity about this new and interesting development on the American scene.

We knew, for example, that on June 26, 1935, by executive order of the President, the National Youth Administration was set up with $50,000,000 of relief funds earmarked for its use.

This was the President's declaration, in establishing the NYA:

I have determined that we shall do something for the Nation's unemployed youth, because we can ill afford to lose the skill and energy of these young men and women. They must have their chance in school, their turn as apprentices, and their opportunity for jobs -- a chance to work and earn for themselves.

It is recognized that the final solution of this whole problem of unemployed youth will not be attained until there is resumption of normal business activities and opportunities for private employment on a wide scale. I believe that the National Youth Program will serve the most pressing and immediate needs of that portion

-3-

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