A New Deal for Youth: The Story of the National Youth Administration

By Betty Grimes Lindley; Ernest K. Lindley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
Co-operating for an Education

No BERIBBONED DIPLOMAS. NO LATIN, CHAUCER, OR Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. No grades. No credits.

Instead, plowing, harrowing, fertilizing land. Raising fruits, vegetables, and livestock. Running and maintaining farm machinery. Repairing and building dairy barns, feed houses, and dormitories. Making furniture. Planning and cooking meals. Studying how and why all this work is done. Earning board and keep and having a little left over for clothes or for the folks back home who need it.

What kind of school is this?

It is an NYA Resident Project for young men and women from relief families.

From the beginning of the NYA work program, rural youth have been a challenge. It is difficult to provide sound work for isolated boys and girls who have no way of getting to or from a construction job, a workshop, or a sewing room in a town 20 miles away from their farms. It is often impossible to offer related training to these young people. When boys and girls are placed as helpers in the county agricultural agent's office or with the county surveyor, or in a library, hospital, or with the highway department, supervision is good. These types of sponsors, however, can absorb only a portion of the rural youth, who, perhaps even more than boys and girls from towns and cities, desperately need work and training under competent, helpful supervision.

Southwestern Louisiana Institute, a State engineering, teach-

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