Workmen's Compensation: Prevention, Insurance, and Rehabilitation of Occupational Disability

By Herman Miles Somers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Rehabilitation

Prevention, no matter what stage of advancement it reaches, can never be complete; we have seen that it may in fact be something of an achievement if it holds its own against the onslaughts of new chemical and physical processes. Benefit payments and medical care, however generous, can never fully compensate for the personal tragedy of functionless lives and the social waste of unutilized manpower. Almost from the very beginning, compensation officials realized that enlightened public policy must explore thoroughly means of salvaging the wasted lives and skills resulting from the annual toll of permanent occupational disabilities. What we cannot or do not prevent, we may be able to repair or rebuild.


The Modern Miracle

Modern science has wrought a miracle. The technical means to human rehabilitation have been discovered. Bodies apparently incapacitated for further useful work can be reconstructed and retrained to take their place again in production and in self-esteem. Whether approached with religious regard for the value of the humblest individual, or through concern with the income and productivity of the American economy, the literature of rehabilitation offers an exciting and encouraging illustration of the potential triumph of human intelligence over physical handicap. For example, Dr. Henry H. Kessler, director of the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, a pioneer in this young field, tells the following story:1

[In 1944] a young miner with a broken back and a spinal cord injury, causing a paraplegia, was referred to us for rehabilitation. He had also had such extensive bed sores that the treating doctors thought it would be

____________________
1
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC), Proceedings 1950, U. S. Bureau of Labor Standards, Bull. 142, p. 157.

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workmen's Compensation: Prevention, Insurance, and Rehabilitation of Occupational Disability
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.