The Roman Near East, 31 B.C.-A.D. 337

By Fergus Millar | Go to book overview

MAPS

The twelve maps which follow are designed solely to assist comprehension of the text of the book. Map I is an outline map of the Near East, with indications of the areas covered in the following maps. Map II covers most of the Roman Near East, and is intended as a guide to the main sites and most important geographical features, above all mountain-ranges and rivers. Maps III-XII cover the various sub-regions of the Roman Near East, with in some cases smaller or larger degrees of overlap.

While every attempt has been made to represent physical features accurately, the small scale means that inevitably the maps have something of the character of sketch-maps. They should give a useful impression of the relationships between individual sites and their geographical contexts. But they should not be used for reading off precise distances.

Where there are modern place-names which are in general use -- for instance Jerusalem, Tyre or Antioch -- these are used. Otherwise ancient names are given in their Latin form and in capitals. No attempt has been made to indicate the full complexity of changing official titles, for instance those of places which became Roman coloniae. In some of the many instances where places changed their names, both names have been given, where space allows. Where necessary for clarity, and to make it easier to relate the maps to the text, modern names, in simplified form, have been given in lower case.

It should be emphasized that the maps make no attempt to indicate all the known ancient sites, still less to give an impression of overall settlementpatterns, and are designed solely to make it possible to locate, directly or by reference to other places, all the sites and regions mentioned in the text.

-563-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Roman Near East, 31 B.C.-A.D. 337
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 587

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.