Face to Face: The Changing State of Racism across America

By James Waller | Go to book overview

Advance Praise for Face to Face!

"Compelling. Comprehensive. Truth seeking. Face to Face is a must read for those who labor to develop racial and ethnic tolerance in America. Waller unmasks modern racism and provides seven principles for reconciliation. Educators and others who wish to develop intentional strategies leading to racial reconciliation have, in this book, a substantive tool to begin a dialogue about race in America."

-- Gwendolyn J. Cooke, Ph.D., Director, Urban Services Office, National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, Washington

" Face to Face is a powerful and eloquent examination of racism in America, crucial for our nation's evolving consciousness. The convergence of races and cultures is felt acutely in our public schools; this book, therefore, is critical reading for those who recognize the potential and responsibility of our schools in fostering racial reconciliation."

-- Jeffrey A. Frykholm, Ph.D., Department of Teaching and Learning, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia

"A rare treat! Waller portrays racism as an all-too-human phenomena that will not just fade away. Face to Face will empower readers who are troubled by the persistence of racism to do something about it."

-- Aubyn Fulton, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Pacific Union College, Angwin, California

" Waller's book comes at a critical time in our nation's dialogue on racism. Face to Face unflinchingly examines the dual myths that life is good for racial minorities and that racism is on the wane."

-- Karol Maybury, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Whitworth College, Spokane, Washington

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