Face to Face: The Changing State of Racism across America

By James Waller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to many people who have been influential in the development of this book. My colleagues in the Psychology Department at Whitworth College -- William Johnson, Noel Wescombe, Karol Maybury, and Adrian Teo -- have been a wonderful oasis of support, encouragement, and collegiality. Noel Wescombe was the first to suggest that I write this book, and I am especially appreciative of his enthusiasm during the early days when I wondered if the manuscript would ever see the light of day.

Several people read an early draft of the manuscript and offered outstanding direction. Among these were Carl and Judy Pearson, the 21 students of my 1998 study tour, David Myers, and Karol Maybury. I am particularly appreciative of Karol Maybury for her wonderful service as my primary reader and of David Myers for his encouragement to "reveal myself as an author" and his kindness in writing the foreword to this book.

Along the way, several colleagues have taken their time to offer general advice on publishing or resources for specific sections of the book. Thanks here go to Forrest Baird, Bob Clark, Aubyn Fulton, Gordon Jackson, Lois Kieffaber, Doris Liebert, Linda Hunt, Bill Robinson, Richard Schatz, and Gerald Sittser. To Jim Singleton, thanks for the friendship and the examples -- it's nice to be on the other side for a change! To the CORE 150 team, thanks for picking up some of my classroom responsibilities during the final push of writing. Over the past several years, I also have had the privilege of having both my mind and heart nurtured by a wonderful group of friends-Forrest Baird (again), Terry McGonigal, Dick Mandeville, Ron Pyle, Gerald Sittser (again), and Dale Soden.

-xxi-

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