Philip Schuyler and the American Revolution in New York, 1733-1777

By Don R. Gerlach | Go to book overview

Acknowledgwnts

MY STUDY of Philip Schuyler and the American Revolution began when I commenced graduate training in history in the autumn of 1954. From that day to this I have enjoyed the assistance and encouragement of several accomplished teachers and scholars. To Professor John Richard Alden I owe the inception of my interest in Philip Schuyler as well as the earliest direction of my research. Professor Aubrey C. Land ably guided my first written efforts and also has been most helpful in putting the book into its final form. Dr. Jack M. Sosin afforded the last major supervision of my doctoral dissertation entitled, "Philip Schuyler: The Origins of a Conservative Patriot, 1733-1777, A Study in Provincial Politics and the American Revolution in New York" (from whence this book sprang). I am particularly grateful for his critical but solicitous guidance. Not only did he steer me around pitfalls, force me to rethink interpretations and to sharpen my perceptiveness, but to him I am deeply indebted for the encouragement that only a good adviser can offer. Professors E. David Cronon, Robert Forster, and James C. Olson kindly offered corrections and suggestions. Professor Glenn W. Gray provided special assistance for Appendix C. And George Dangerfield graciously furnished some particularly good suggestions; I am grateful for his encouragement.

My thanks are likewise due the University of Nebraska for providing funds for microfilming, scholarships, and fellowships which enabled me to complete this study with a minimum of interruption. A Fulbright Scholarship offered me the invaluable experience of dipping into British archives and of imbibing the spirit of English history so helpful for an appreciation of colonial America.

The courteous service of librarians, archivists, and others, in this country and in England, is also worthy of acknowledgment. Mr. Robert W. Hill, Keeper of the Manuscripts, and his assistant, Miss Jean McNiece, of the New York Public Library, Mr. Wilmer R. Leech and Mr. Arthur J. Breton of the New-York Historical Society, Miss Juliet Wolohan, Senior Librarian of the New York State Library Manuscripts and History Section, Dr. Albert B. Corey, New York State Historian, Mr. Norman Rice, Curator of the Albany Institute of History and Art, and Mr. William Campbell, custodian of the Schuyler mansion, facilitated my researches and greatly added to the enjoyment of my labors.

Whatever merits are found in these pages are in no small measure due to

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