Conceptions of State and Kingship in Southeast Asia

By Robert Heine-Geldern | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Professor Robert Heine-Geldern of the University of Vienna is clearly the doyen of all anthropologists specializing in the whole region to which he himself has helped attach the label of "Southeast Asia." His broad anthropological training, his acute scholarship, and his deep humanistic interests have been devoted almost entirely to this area for forty very productive years. The section on "'Sudostasian", almost, three hundred pages in length, which he contributed in 1923 to the second volume of Georg Buschan's Illustrierte Volkerkunde is still, in spite of much outdating, the best available detailed account of the prehistoric and historic physical, linguistic, and cultural types of this anthropologically significant but complex part of Asia. His early definition of the Southeast Asian culture area as extending from Assam eastwards to include aboriginal Taiwan and from Southern China southwards through the Indian archipelago stands among anthropologists today. For the island world he adopted the Greek term "Indonesia", first advanced in the 1860's by the German anthropologist Bastian, later incorporated into the Malayo-Polynesian languages of the East Indies (although its use there was forbidden by the Dutch), and now the name of the sixth most populous nation of the world. This recognition of ethnographic Indonesia as a part of Southeast Asia has helped anthropologists understand some of the basic cultural similarities which existed in the region before it was influenced by Chinese, Indic, Moslem and North Atlantic civilizations.

The present paper by Dr. Heine-Geldern is an interesting contribution to an aspect of the political development of this region under influences coming particularly from or through India. The paper has been used at Cornell University as an assigned reading in courses on Southeast Asia since its first publication in The Far Eastern Quarterly. Now with the very kind editorial permission of the Far Eastern Association and of Dr. Heine-Geldern, and with a few minor changes incorporated at the suggestion of the author, the paper is issued by the Cornell Southeast Asia Program in the hope that it may be found useful in the increasing number of courses being given on this area in academic institutions.

This foreword is written with a special sense of gratitude by the undersigned, who began his anthropological studies of Southeast Asia in Vienna in 1930 under Dr. Heine-Geldern's able guidance. To a fine scholar and teacher who has done so much for Southeast Asian studies in America as elsewhere. sincere personal and professional thanks are offered.

Lauriston Sharp, Director Southeast Asia Program

Department of Far Eastern Studies Cornell University Ithaca, New York April, 1956

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conceptions of State and Kingship in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cornell University Southeast Asia Program ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Macrocosmos and Microcosmos 1
  • The Capital as the Magic Center of Empire 3
  • The Capital of Burma 3
  • Cosmic Roles of King, Court and Government 5
  • Survival of Traditions 6
  • A Few Books and Articles Pertaining to the Subject 11
  • Cornell University Southeast Asia Program 15
  • Cornell University Southeast Asia Program 16
  • In Print 17
  • Out of Print 20
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 24

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.