The City as a Human Environment

By Duane G. Levine; Arthur C. Upton | Go to book overview

17
CONCLUSIONS

DUANE G. LEVINE AND ARTHUR C. UPTON

There are numerous interactions between planning the built environment, improving, transportation, and shaping patterns of land use. For instance, spatial location of populations affects the type of alternatives available to improve transportation. A very interesting, very complex set of contradictions and tradeoffs were discussed in the previous chapters. In the United States, many of us desire the advantages of relative separation, safety, and status associated with life in the suburbs--a somewhat lower density lifestyle. A more dense, integrated land use pattern supports greater numbers of people who are closer to jobs, stores, and other amenities. This directionally reduces their use of the automobile for daily errands, cutting down on street congestion, noise, and emissions. It is also easier to provide bus service and utilities for higher density communities. This decreases the cost of housing, as well as public transportation, and allows for more open space. Unfortunately, efforts to make housing more affordable are often neutralized by rising costs, landscaping, and handicapped access requirements. Hence, societal needs to enhance community aesthetics and provide all citizens with equal access thwart equally important efforts to provide basic housing needs. Assessing and understanding these interactions and the needs and priorities of a community is essential to developing a planning scheme that will shape patterns of land use in a desirable fashion, ensuring space for housing, offices, shops, factories, public places, transport routes, utilities, and historic structures.

Some changes needed for planning the built environment include: (1)

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