Positioning the Missionary: John Booth Good and the Confluence of Cultures in Nineteenth-Century British Columbia

By Brett Christophers | Go to book overview

6 Morals

Good was in British Columbia 'not only to evangelize but to civilize,' 1 for it was clear to him that the 'heathen' lacked Christian civility as well as Christian Truth. When he first lectured at Lytton in May 1867, he told his future charges that if he did establish a mission among them, moral reform would go hand in hand with religious teaching. 2 Like other Anglican missionaries, he was convinced that moral improvement required enlightenment. Thus, while the colonial government encouraged mission work as an important means to civilize Natives, the Anglicans saw it as the only means, for morality without religion was deemed morality without motive, and civilization without Christianity was therefore 'lame charity.' 3 A civilized Native population was by definition a Christian population. 'To preach Christ,' Good said of the Anglican burden in the mission field, 'must be our first purpose.'4

Moral reform was more than a handmaiden to evangelization. Mindful of feigned conversion, Good doubted the value of confession alone and required evidence of 'changed life' before he would baptize his charges. Although moral calibre became his principal barometer of Native faith, he did not belittle the examination ritual that verified conversion; he ruled, rather, that Natives should not get the chance to prove themselves to Hills 'upon their merely saying they believe.' 5 Assuming that daily conduct revealed the inner truth that words could obfuscate, Good established a set of ethical qualifications for baptism. He demanded 'effectual moral change of Heart & Feeling & an eradication of all superstitions and heathen fancies, with, of course, an outward abandonment of all old forms & ways that are positively antagonistical to moral & spiritual growth & development.' 6 More specifically, Natives were to forsake 'medicine-men' and traditional burial customs and to resist the temptations of gambling and alcohol.

The chief criterion of moral worth, however, was marital status. According to Michel Foucault, it is common for a single element of personal conduct to assume unusual importance in social constructions of morality.

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Positioning the Missionary: John Booth Good and the Confluence of Cultures in Nineteenth-Century British Columbia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • 1 - Beginnings 3
  • 2 - Redemption 19
  • 3 - Reproduction 41
  • 4 - Space 67
  • 5 - Conversion 92
  • 6 - Morals 119
  • 7 - Dissolution 137
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliography 182
  • Index 193
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.