The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Nem. Great Arimanes, doth thy will
avouch 450 The wishes of this mortal?

Ari. Yea.

Nem. Whom wouldst thou Uncharnel?

Man. One without a tomb -- call up Astarte.

NEMESIS.

Shadow! or Spirit!
Whatever thou art,
Which still doth inherit
The whole or a part
Of the form of thy birth,
Of the mould of thy clay
Which return'd to the earth, -- 460 Re-appear to the day!
Bear what thou borest,
The heart and the form,
And the aspect thou worest
Redeem from the worm.
Appear! -- Appear! -- Appear!
Who sent thee there requires thee here!

[The phantom of ASTARTE rises and stands in the midst.

Man. Can this be death? there's bloom upon her cheek;
But now I see it is no living hue,
But a strange hectic -- like the unnatural
red 470 Which Autumn plants upon the perish'd leaf.
It is the same! Oh, God! that I should dread
To look upon the same -- Astarte No,
I cannot speak to her -- but bid her speak --
Forgive me or condemn me.

NEMESIS.

By the power which hath broken The grave which enthrall'd thee, Speak to him who hath spoken, Or those who have call'd thee!

Man. She is silent,
And in that silence I am more than answer'd. 480

Nem. My power extends no further. Prince of air!
It rests with thee alone -- command her voice.

Ari. Spirit -- obey this sceptre

Nem. Silent still! She is not of our order, but belongs To the other powers. Mortal! thy quest is vain,
And we are baffled also.

Man. Hear me, hear me --
Astarte! my belovèd! speak tome:
I have so much endured, so much endure --
Look on me! the grave hath not changed thee more
Than I am changed for thee. Thou lovèdst
me 490 Too much, as I loved thee: we were not made
To torture thus each other, though it were
The deadliest sin to love as we have loved.
Say that thou loath'si me not, that I do bear
This punishment for both, that thou wilt be
One of the blessèd, and that I shall die;
For hitherto all hateful things conspire
To bind me in existence -- in a life
Which makes me shrink from immortality --
A future like the past. I cannot rest. 500 I know not what I ask, nor what I seek:
I feel but what thou art -- and what I am;
And I would hear yet once before I perish
The voice which was my music -- Speak to me!
For I have call'd on thee in the still night,
Startled the slumbering birds from the hush'd boughs,
And woke the mountain wolves, and made the eaves
Acquainted with thy vainly echo'd name,
Which answer'd me -- many things an-swer'd me --
Spirits and men -- but thou wert silent all.
Yet speak to me! I have outwatch'd the
stars, 511 And gazed o'er heaven in vain in search of thee.
Speak to me! I have wander'd o'er the earth,
And never found thy likeness -- Speak to me!
Look on the fiends around -- they feel for me:
I fear them not, and feel for thee alone.
Speak to me! though it be in wrath; -- but say --
I reek not what -- but let me hear thee once --
This once -- once more!

Phantom of Astarte. Manfred

Man. Say on, say on -- I live but in the sound -- it is thy voice!

Phan. Manfred! To-morrow ends thine
earthly ills. 521 Farewell!

-490-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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