The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

No less than he who was thy sovereign Six hours ago, and now thy brother rebel.

I. Ber. 'T is not the moment to consider

thus, 81
Else I could answer. -- Let us to the meet-ing,
Or we may be observed in lingering here.

Doge. We are observed, and have been.

I. Ber. We observed? Let me discover -- and this steel --

Doge. Put up; Here are no human witnesses; look there -- What see you?

I. Ber. Only a tall warrior's statue Bestriding a proud steed, in the dim light Of the dull moon.

Doge. That warrior was the sire

Of my sire's fathers, and that statue was 90
Decreed to him by the twice rescued city: --
Think you that he looks down on us, or no?

I. Ber. My lord, these are mere fantasies; there are

No eyes in marble.

Doge. But there are in Death.
I tell thee, man, there is a spirit in
Such things that acts and sees, unseen, though felt;
And, if there be a spell to stir the dead,
'T is in such deeds as we are now upon.
Deem'st thou the souls of such a race as mine
Can rest, when he, their last descendant

chief, 100
Stands plotting on the brink of their pure graves
With stung plebeians?

I. Ber. It had been as well To have ponder'd this before, -- ere you embark'd
In our great enterprise. Do you repent?

Doge. No, but I feel, and shall do to the last.
I cannot quench a glorious life at once,
Nor dwindle to the thing I now must be,
And take men's lives by stealth, without some pause.
Yet doubt me not; it is this very feeling,
And knowing what has wrung me to be

thus,110
Which is your best security. There's not
A roused mechanic in your busy plot
So wrong'd as I, so fall'n, so loudly call'd
To his redress: the very means I am forced
By these fell tyrants to adopt is such,
That I abhor them doubly for the deeds
Which I must do to pay them back for theirs.

I. Ber. Let us away -- hark -- the hour strikes.

Doge. On -- on -- It is our knell, or that of Venice -- On.

I. Ber. Say rather, 't is her freedom's

rising peal 120
Of triumph. This way -- we are near the place. [Exeunt.


SCENE II

The House where the Conspirators meet.

DAGOLINO, DORO, BERTRAM, FEDELE TREVISANO, CALENDARO, ANTONIO DELLE BENDE, ETC., ETC.

Cal. (entering). Are all here?

Dag. All with you; except the three On duty, and our leader Israel, Who is expected momently.

Cal. Where's Bertram Ber. Here!

Cal. Have you not been able to complete
The number wanting in your company?

Ber. I had markd out some: but I have not dared
To trust them with the secret, till assured That they were worthy faith.

Cal. There is no need
Of trusting to their faith: who, save our

selves 130
And our more chosen comrades, is aware
Fully of our intent? they think themselves
Engaged in secret to the Signory,
To punish some more dissolute young nobles
Who have defied the law in their excesses;
But once drawn up, and their new swords well-fiesh'd
In the rank hearts of the more odious sen-ators,
They will not hesitate to follow up
Their blow upon the others, when they see
The example of their chiefs, and I for one
Will set them such, that they for very
shame 141
And safety will not pause till all have perish'd.

Ber.How say you? all!

Cal. Whom wouldst thou spare?

Ber. I spare? I have no power to spare. I only ques-tion'd,
Thinking that even amongst these wicked men

-520-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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