The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Stral.Do so, and take yon old ass with you.

Fritz.Hence!

Ulr. Come on, old oracle, expound thy riddle! [Exit with IDENSTEINand FRITZ.

Stral.(solus). A stalwart, active, soldier-looking stripling,
Handsome as Hercules ere his first labour,
And with a brow of thought beyond his years
When in repose, till his eye kindles up
In answering yours. I wish I could engage him;
I have need of some such spirits near me now,
For this inheritance is worth a struggle. 260 And though I am not the man to yield with-out one,
Neither are they who now rise up between me
And my desire. The boy, they say, 's a bold one;
But he hath play'd the truant in some hour
Of freakish folly, leaving fortune to
Champion his claims. That's well. The father whom
For years I've track'd, as does the blood-hound, never
In sight, but constantly in seent, had put me
To fault; but here I have him, and that 's better.
It must be he! All circumstance proclaims it; 270 And careless voices, knowing not the cause
Of my inquiries, still confirm it. -- Yes!
The man, his bearing, and the mystery
Of his arrival, and the time; the account, too,
The intendant gave (for I have not beheld her)
Of his wife's dignified but foreign aspect;
Besides the antipathy with which we met,
As snakes and lions shrink back from each other
By secret instinct that both must be foes
Deadly, without being natural prey to either;
All -- all -- confirm it to my mind. However, 281. We'll grapple, ne'er the less. In a few hours
The order comes from Frankfort, if these waters
Rise not the higher (and the weather fa-vours
Their quick abatement), and I'll have him safe
Within a dungeon, where he may avouch
His real estate and name; and there's no harm done,
Should he prove other than I deem. This robbery
(Save for the actual loss) is lucky also:
He 's poor, and that 's suspicious -- he 's unknown, 290 And that 's defenceless. -- True, we have no proofs
Of guilt, -- but what hath he of innocence?
Were he a man indifferent to my prospects,
In other bearings, I should rather lay
The iculpation on the Hungarian, who
Hath something which I like not; and alone
Of all around, except the intendant and
The prince's household and my own, had ingress
Familiar to the chamber.

Enter GABOR.

Friend, how fare you?

Gab.As those who fare well everywhere, when they 300 Have supp'd and slumber'd, no great mat-ter how --
And you, my lord?

Stral.Better in rest than purse: Mine inn is like to cost me dear.

Gab.I heard Of your late loss; but 't is a trifle to One of your order.

Stral.You would hardly think so, Were the loss yours.

Gab.I never had so much (At once) in my whole life, and therefore am not Fit to decide. But I came here to seek you. Your couriers are turn'd back -- I have outstripp'd them, In my return.

Stral.You! -- Why?

Gab.I went at daybreak, 310 To watch for the abatement of the river,
As being anxious to resume my journey.
Your messengers were all check'd like my-self;
And, seeing the case hopeless, I await
The current's pleasure.

Stral.Would the dogs were in it! Why did they not, at least, attempt the passage? I order'd this at all risks.

Gab.Could you order The Oder to divide, as Moses did

-687-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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