The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Ulr. Oh, heavens! I left him in a green old age, 380 And looking like the oak, worn, but still steady
Amidst the elements, whilst younger trees
Fell fast around him. 'T was scarce three months since.

Wer. Why did you leave him?

Jos. (embracing ULRIC). Can you ask that question? Is he not here?

Wer. True: he hath sought his parents, And found them; but, oh! how,and in what state!

Ulr. All shall be better'd. What we have to do
Is to proceed, and to assert our rights,
Or rather yours; for I waive all, unless
Your father has disposed in such a sort 390 Of his broad lands as to make mine the foremost,
So that I must prefer my claim for form:
But I trust better, and that all is yours.

Wer. Have you not heard of Stralenheim?

Ulr. I saved His life but yesterday: he's here.

Wer. You saved The serpent who will sting us all!

Ulr. You speak Riddles: what is this Stralenheim to us?

Wer. Every thing. One who claims our fathers' lands; Our distant kinsman, and our nearest foe.

Ulr. I never heard his name till now.
The count, 400 Indeed, spoke sometimes of a kinsman, who,
If his own line should fail, might be re-motely
Involved in the succession; but his titles
Were never named before me -- and what then?
His right must yield to ours.

Wer. Ay, if at Prague: But here he is all-powerful; and has spread Snares for thy father, which, if hitherto He hath escaped them, is by fortune, not By favour.

Ulr. Doth he personally know you?

Wer. No; but he guesses shrewdly at my person, 410 As he betray'd last night; and I, perhaps,
But owe my temporary liberty
To his uncertainty.

Ulr. I think you wrong him
(Excuse me for the phrase); but Stralen-heim.
Is not what you prejudge him, or, if so,
He owes me something both for past and present.
I saved his life, he therefore trusts in me.
He hath been plunder'd too, since he came hither:
Is sick; a stranger; and as such not now
Able to trace the villain who hath robb'd him. 420 I have pledged myself to do so; and the business
Which brought me here was chiefly that: but I
Have found, in searching for another's dross,
My own whole treasure -- you, my parents!

Wer. (agitatedly). Who Taught you to mouth that name of 'villain'?

Ulr. What More noble name belongs to common thieves?

Wer. Who taught you thus to brand an unknown being With an infernal stigma?

Ulr. My own feelings Taught me to name a ruffian from his deeds.

Wer. Who taught you, long-sought and ill-found boy! that 430 It would be safe for my own son to insult me?

Ulr. I named a villain. What is there in common With such a being and my father?

Wer. Every thing! That ruffian is thy father!

Jos. Oh, my son! Believe him not -- and yet! -- (her voice falters).

Ulr. (starts, looks earnestly at WERNER, and then says slowly) And you avow it?

Wer. Ulric, before you dare despise your father,
Learn to divine and judge his actions.
Young,
Rash, new to life, and rear'd in luxury's lap,
Is it for you to measure passion's force,
Or misery's temptation? Wait (not long,
It cometh like the night, and quickly) --
Wait! --
441

-689-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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