The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Your bosom (for the appearance of the man Is pitiful) -- he is a wretch, as likely 751 To have robb'd me as the fellow more suspected, Except that circumstance is less against him; He being lodged far off, and in a chamber Without approach to mine. And, to say truth, I think too well of blood allied to mine, To deem he would descend to such an act: Besides, he was a soldier, and a brave one Once -- though too rash.

Ulr. And they, my lord, we know By our experience, never plunder till 760 They knock the brains out first -- which makes them heirs, Not thieves. The dead, who feel nought, can lose nothing, Nor e'er be robb'd: their spoils are a bequest -- No more.

Stral. Go to! you area wag. But say I may be sure you'll keep an eye on this man, And let me know his slightest movement towards Concealment or escape?

Ulr. You may be sure You yourself could not watch him more than I Will be his sentinel.

Stral. By this you make me Yours, and for ever.

Ulr. Such is my intention. 770

[Exeunt.


ACT III

SCENE I

A Hall in the same Palace, from whence the secret Passage leads.

Enter WERNER,and GABOR.

Gab. Sir, I have told my tale: if it so please you To give me refuge for a few hours, well -- If not, I'll try my fortune elsewhere. Wer. How Can I, so wretched, give to Misery A shelter? -- wanting such myself as much As e'er the hunted deer a covert --

Gab. Or The wounded lion his cool cave. Methinks You rather look like one would turn at bay, And rip the hunter's entrails. Wer. Ah!

Gab. I care not
If it be so, being much disposed to do
10

The same myself. But will you shelter me?
I am oppress'd like you, and poor like you,
Disgraced --

Wer. (abruptly). Who told you that I was disgraced?

Gab. No one; nor did I say you were so: with Your poverty my likeness ended; but I said I was so -- and would add, with truth, As undeservedly as you.

Wer. Again! As I?

Gab. Or any other honest man. What the devil would you have? You don't believe me Guilty of this base theft?

Wer. No, no -- I cannot. 20

Gab. Why, that's my heart of honour! yon young gallant, Your miserly intendant, and dense noble, All -- all suspected me; and why? because I am the worst-clothed and least named amongst them; Although, were Momus' lattice in your breasts, My soul might brook to open it more widely Than theirs: but thus it is -- you poor and helpless, Both still more than myself.

Wer. How know you that?

Gab. You're right: I ask for shelter at the hand Which I call helpless; if you now deny it, 30 I were well paid. But you, who seem to have proved The wholesome bitterness of life, know well, By sympathy, that all the outspread gold Of the New World the Spaniard boasts about Could never tempt the man who knows its worth, Weigh'd at its proper value in the balance, Save in such guise (and there I grant its power, Because I feel it) as may leave no nightmare Upon his heart o' nights,

Wer. What do you mean?

Gab. Just what I say; I thought my speech was plain. 40

You are no thief, nor I; and, as true men,
Should aid each other.

Wer. It is a damn'd world, sir.

Gab. So is the nearest of the two next, as

-695-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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