The Works of Lucian of Samosata: Complete with Exceptions Specified in the Preface - Vol. 1

By F. G. Fowler; Lucian et al. | Go to book overview

Her. Well, you know best. Now, Hephaestus, we must be going; see, here comes the eagle.--Bear a brave heart, Prometheus; and all speed to your Theban archer, who is to set a term to this creature's activity. F.


DIALOGUES OF THE GODS

I
Prometheus. Zeus

Prom. Release me, Zeus; I have suffered enough. Zeus. Release you? you? Why, by rights your irons should be heavier, you should have the whole weight of Caucasus upon you, and instead of one, a dozen vultures, not just pecking at your liver, but scratching out your eyes. You made these abominable human creatures to vex us, you stole our fire, you invented women. I need not remind you how you over- reached me about the meat-offerings; my portion, bones disguised in fat: yours, all the good.

Prom. And have I not been punished enough--riveted to the Caucasus all these years, feeding your bird (on which all worst curses light!) with my liver?

Zeus. 'Tis not a tithe of your deserts.

Prom. Consider, I do not ask you to release me for nothing. I offer you information which is invaluable.

Zeus. Promethean wiles!

Prom. Wiles? to what end? you can find the Caucasus another time; and there are chains to be had, if you catch me cheating.

Zeus. Tell me first the nature of your 'invaluable' offer.

Prom. If I tell you your present errand right, will that convince you that I can prophesy too

Zeus. Of course it will.

Prom. You are bound on a little visit to Thetis.

-62-

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