Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant - Vol. 1

By Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII.
PROMOTED MAJOR-GENERAL OF VOLUNTEERS -- UNOCCU
PIED TERRITORY -- ADVANCE UPON NASHVILLE --
SITUATION OF THE TROO PS -- CON FEDERATE RETREAT
-- RELIEVED OF THE COMMAND -- RESTORED TO THE
COMMAND -- GENERAL SMITH.

THE news of the fall of Fort Donelson caused great delight all over the North. At the South, particularly in Richmond, the effect was correspondingly depressing. I was promptly promoted to the grade of Major-General of Volunteers, and confirmed by the Senate. All three of my division commanders were promoted to the same grade and the colonels who commanded brigades were made brigadiergenerals in the volunteer service. My chief, who was in St. Louis, telegraphed his congratulations to General Hunter in Kansas for the services he had rendered in securing the fall of Fort Donelson by sending reinforcements so rapidly. To Washington he telegraphed that the victory was due to General C. F. Smith; "promote him," he said, "and the whole country will applaud." On the 19th there was published at St. Louis a formal order thanking Flag 

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