Religious Controversies of the Elizabethan Age: A Survey of Printed Sources

By Peter Milward | Go to book overview

Robert Bellarmine, who though an Italian, living and writing in Rome, came to take a leading part in the English controversies (those conducted in Latin) from the '80s onwards? Whenever such questions have arisen, it has been my general policy to be all-inclusive, even at the risk of extending my quest to apparent endlessness -- though here and there I have uttered a reluctant 'No'.

As for the time limits of this survey, it is simple enough to begin with the accession of Queen Elizabeth; for that important event, which may well be called the main turning-point of English history, was in fact the starting- point of all the controversies recorded in this volume. But when the Queen died in 1603, the controversies did not all die with her, though many of them, like the Appellant controversy, did, and the new reign of James I certainly brought in a new approach to religion. There are not a few controversies that linger on into the new reign, and others that had their beginnings in the closing years of Elizabeth but their full development under James. still, I have done my best to round off the various controversies as best I could with the death of Queen Elizabeth, though in one or two cases I have ventured to trespass into the new reign. In any case, I have found both my studies of these religious controversies and my previous interest in Shakespearian drama combining to demand the preparation of a sequel to this volume under the parallel title of Religious Controversies of the Jacobean Age.

Finally, I must acknowledge my indebtedness, not only to the librarians and staff of the various libraries I have visited in the course of my pilgrimage, but also to the authorities of Sophia University for granting me a sabbatical year in which to bring my researches to their (comparative) completion, and to those who have afforded me hospitality in the various places I have stopped at on my pilgrim's route: Mgr. James Hourihan, of Saint Andrew's Church, Pasadena; the Rector of Georgetown University, Washington; Canon Raymund Hammer, of the Queen's College, Birmingham; Dr. Anthony Dyson, Principal of Ripon Hall, Oxford; Canon Paul Taylor, pastor of the Church of Our Lady and the English Martyrs, Cambridge; the Master of Campion Hall, Oxford; the Rectors of Stonyhurst, Mount St. Mary's and Oscott; the Superior of the Jesuit residence at Mount Street, London; the Abbot of Ampleforth; and, above all, my own family in Wimbledon. I am also particularly, indebted to my publisher, Mr. John Commander of The Scolar Press, to his predecessor, Dr. Robin Alston, to the Editor of the English Recusant Literature series of facsimiles, Dr. David Rogers, and to Mr. Sean Magee of The Scolar Press, who have all encouraged and assisted me in a variety of ways. I hope that with the publication of this volume I may do something to repay my debt.

Sophia University, Tokyo Peter Milward, S.J. 1 May 1975

-xiv-

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Religious Controversies of the Elizabethan Age: A Survey of Printed Sources
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Chapter 1 Anglican Challenge 1
  • Chapter 2 Puritan Admonition 25
  • Chapter 3 Catholic Reasons 39
  • Chapter 4 Presbyterian Discipline 77
  • Chapter 5 Appellant Considerations 108
  • Chapter 6 Protestant V. Papist 127
  • Chapter 7 Puritan V. Protestant 157
  • Index 175
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