Religious Controversies of the Elizabethan Age: A Survey of Printed Sources

By Peter Milward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Puritan Admonition

a) The Vestiarian controversy

FROM the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in England under Edward VI there had appeared a fundamental cleavage between the moderates and the radicals -- between those who were content with the reform of what they regarded as abuses in the Church and those who aimed at a complete break with the past in the light of what they regarded as the true Church of God. This cleavage was first expressed in the controversy over the practical issue of the wearing of vestments and the observing of certain ceremonies as prescribed in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. After the accession of Queen Elizabeth in 1558, the more radical ministers felt themselves at liberty to disregard these prescriptions, and thus a considerable variety in the manner of conducting religious services prevailed during the early years of the new reign. The Queen herself complained about this situation to her new Archbishop of Canterbury, Matthew Parker; and he accordingly set about enforcing a more exact conformity among his clergy. But when he summoned the London ministers to a meeting at his palace at Lambeth on 26 March 1566, he found himself faced with a strong opposition. No less than one-third of their number refused to conform and subscribe to his requirements, even at the cost of being deprived of their livings. It was in connection with this meeting that he drew up certain Advertisements in the name of the bishops, though without the formal ratification of the Queen herself.

97. Advertisments partly for due order in the publique administration of common prayers and usinge the holy Sacramentes, and partly for the apparrell of all persons ecclesiasticall, by vertue of the Queenes majesties letters commaunding the same, the xxv. day of Ianuary, in the seventh yeare of the reigne of our Soveraigne Lady Elyzabeth, by the grace of God, of Englande, Fraunce, and Irelande Queene, defender of the faith &c. 1566 ( STC10026)

This document, reinforced by 'protestations to be made, promised and

-25-

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Religious Controversies of the Elizabethan Age: A Survey of Printed Sources
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Chapter 1 Anglican Challenge 1
  • Chapter 2 Puritan Admonition 25
  • Chapter 3 Catholic Reasons 39
  • Chapter 4 Presbyterian Discipline 77
  • Chapter 5 Appellant Considerations 108
  • Chapter 6 Protestant V. Papist 127
  • Chapter 7 Puritan V. Protestant 157
  • Index 175
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