The Steel Industry, 1939-1959: A Study in Competition and Planning

By Duncan Burn | Go to book overview

Chapter III
FROM PEACE TO PLENTY:
A CHRONICLE
1945-1959

The wartime interlude from the concerted pursuit of the I.D.A.C.-Steel Federation policies for the orderly collective development of steelmaking under supervision came to an end, as the last chapter has shown, before the end of the war. The war organisation, the Control, had evolved ingenious elaborations of pre-war devices which could be applied in peacetime to continue to stabilise relatively low prices, and it had planned wartime capital development. From the end of 1943 preparations were made by the Federation for planned developments for peace, and a start was made on the work and indeed in some of the works.

In sharp contrast the interlude from competition which the war brought did not come quickly to an end. It could be foreseen that the post-war period would begin as a sellers market, but it had been visualised that there would be a day of reckoning, not long to be deferred, when British steel would have to meet either American or Continental competition, and many had supposed that the low United States prices of the war years would then be a menace to exports from Britain both of steel and of goods made of steel, unless productivity and efficiency in the British industry were rapidly increased. Such was the picture continually painted, even by steelmakers, to stress the urgency of thorough rehabilitation of British steelmaking. But the day of reckoning had not come in the form visualised even by 1958.

The year 1958 saw the third and most serious setback since the war in consumption of steel in the 'West'. The first came in 1949, the second in 1953-54. On the first two occasions steel output in Britain and steel exports from Britain continued to

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Steel Industry, 1939-1959: A Study in Competition and Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 728

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.