History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XL

HAD the presidential contest been close, a charge made by the New YorkSun, during the heat of it, might have turned the scale against Grant. It was alleged that in the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad through the operations of a construction ring, Oakes Ames, the leading spirit of those thus associated had, in order to ensure the performance of certain actions for their benefit, distributed in bribes to members of Congress thirty thousand shares of Credit Mobilier [the construction company] worth nine millions of dollars. Fifteen 1 were named as having received the stock: the Vice-President, the Secretary of the Treasury, two senators, two ex- senators, the Speaker and six other members of the House, besides one ex-representative and one no longer living. Of these Blaine, Dawes, Henry Wilson, Colfax and Garfield explicitly denied the charge and, although the Greeley speakers and journals made the most of it,

____________________
1
Others were disclosed in the investigation; but some of these and of the original fifteen had nothing to do directly or indirectly with the transaction.

-65-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of the Seventh Volume v
  • Chapter Xxxix - History of the United States 1
  • Chapter XL 65
  • Chapter XLI 138
  • Chapter XLII 192
  • Chapter XLIII 239
  • Chapter XLIV 291
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