History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

financial question. The depression, following the financial panic of 1873, and the number of men consequently out of employment weighed in the scale against the party in power. In Ohio, the result was affected by the temperance crusade in the early part of the year. Bands of women of good social standing marched to saloons before which or in which they sang hymns and, kneeling down, prayed that the great evil of drink might be removed. Sympathizing men wrought with them in causing the strict law of the State against the sale of strong liquor to be rigidly enforced. Since Republicans were in the main the instigators of the movement, it alienated from their party a large portion of the German vote.

But the elections did not on the other hand mean that the country placed implicit faith in the Democratic party. Many shrank from the contemplation of a rule in which the South might have a preponderating influence. Indeed the sentiment of Republicans, who voted the Democratic ticket or staid away from the polls, in order to punish their party might have been expressed in the words of the old Scotch minister's prayer concerning Charles I, "Laird shak him ower the mouth o' hell but dinna cast him in."1 1

One result of the election was the passage of an act for the resumption of specie payments. It was evident that whatever was contemplated in that direction must be accomplished before March 4, 1875 when the Republican House would cease to exist; for it was certain that no financial measure could be agreed upon by a Republican Senate and Democratic House. The Republicans were sounder on the financial question than the Democrats and it was clear that the policy decided on must be one of party and the party spirit must be invoked to carry the bill embodying it through Congress.

____________________
1
The Nation, Oct. 22, p. 262.

-133-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of the Seventh Volume v
  • Chapter Xxxix - History of the United States 1
  • Chapter XL 65
  • Chapter XLI 138
  • Chapter XLII 192
  • Chapter XLIII 239
  • Chapter XLIV 291
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