History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLIV

IN cities and towns, it was a common custom for men and boys to go out at night to hear the election returns. On this November 7 the intense anxiety brought from their homes an unusually large number of men, who crowded the streets near the newspaper offices and filled almost to suffocation the rooms of the different headquarters. Others heard the returns at the theatres, still others got the news at their clubs. It was known early in the evening that New York had gone for Tilden and long before midnight that he had also carried New Jersey, Connecticut and Indiana. With these States sure, it was reckoned that he had the "solid South" or enough of it to insure his election by a safe majority in the electoral college. Hardly anybody can have gone to bed that night with any other idea than that Tilden would be the next President. On Wednesday, November 8, nearly every morning newspaper in the country announced his election. But there were two exceptions. The New York Times and the New York Herald said that the result was in doubt. The Herald asked: "Who is elected president? As we go to press this question is nearly as much of a mystery as it was Tuesday morning." In its later and city edition, the Times tabulated 184 votes for Tilden and 181 for Hayes, placing in the Hayes column, South Carolina and Louisiana. Florida, it said, was doubtful but the Republicans claimed that State, whose four votes would

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of the Seventh Volume v
  • Chapter Xxxix - History of the United States 1
  • Chapter XL 65
  • Chapter XLI 138
  • Chapter XLII 192
  • Chapter XLIII 239
  • Chapter XLIV 291
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