The Jewish Threat: Anti-Semitic Politics of the American Army

By Joseph W. Bendersky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Military Intelligence
and "International Jewry,"
1917-1919

IN EARLY JULY-1919, A SECRET AGENT for the American Military Intelligence Division in Paris listened intensely as a Russian aristocrat recounted an incredible tale of barbarism, destruction, and international intrigue. She spoke of Bolshevik atrocities that surpassed the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. They had murdered her sister in the most horrible manner and caused the death of seven other family members. Yet her account differed in a significant way from the typical stories that fleeing blue-blooded Russian émigrés told to anyone who would listen, for she divulged to this agent that "[t]he Bolshevist revolution in Russia is the result of a worldwide Jewish plot to ruin the country in retaliation for the persecution of the Jewish race." 1

Trotsky, Lenin (whose real name was Zimmermann, she asserted with certainty), and most of the Bolshevik leadership were actually "German Jews" hiding their racial origins behind Russian aliases. The non-Semitic Bolsheviks were simply '"puppets" with "weak characters" manipulated by the Jews in controlling the Russian masses. The entire movement was "secretly supported by the most powerful Hebrew financial interests in London, New York, and Paris, through international banking channels and by the most underground methods." These "most powerful financial interests in the world" were also manipulating U.S. and British public opinion by exploiting the leftist and capitalist press in the interests of the "Semitic

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